Clear Mountain Garden Treasures
 

Clear Mountain Garden TreasuresGreen Hood

Orchids
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Glossary
column
A structure on an orchid flower that has both the stigma and stamen.
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terrestrial
A plant that grows on the ground, like most plants do.Grows on or in the ground.
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labellum
A highly modified petal that functions to aid the pollination of orchid flowers.
Often called the "Lip", the labellum gives orchid flowers the lop-sided look.
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column
A structure on an orchid flower that has both the stigma and stamen.
Hide
terrestrial
A plant that grows on the ground, like most plants do.Grows on or in the ground.
Hide
labellum
A highly modified petal that functions to aid the pollination of orchid flowers.
Often called the "Lip", the labellum gives orchid flowers the lop-sided look.
Hide
column
A structure on an orchid flower that has both the stigma and stamen.
Hide
Green Hood

Pterostylis banksii
Family Orchidaceae
Name Pterostylis
Abbreviation Ptst.
Synonym Diplodium
Common Name Greenhood Orchid
Featured Plant September 2007
Etymology
Pterostylis From Greek pteron meaning bird, and Greek stylos meaning style, referring to the concealed winged column.

Pictures:
Pterostylis agathicola
Pterostylis banksii
Pterostylis brumalis
  See also:  Native Orchids

A genus of some 100 or so species of terrestrial orchids, found mainly in New Zealand, Australia, Papua New Guinea and New Caledonia. These orchids have a perculiar flower shape. The dorsal sepal forms a dominant hood over the flower, and hence the common name, Greenhood. The lateral sepals are fused at the bottom and usually end in long spurs.

In New Zealand, they are pollinated by female fungus gnats (Mycetophia Spp.). The gnats are attracted to the flowers by their smell, that resembles the fungi that the gnats lay eggs on. The labellum is hinged and it flips backwards when an insect crawls on it, traping the insect. The only way for the insect to get out is to crawl between the labellum and the column, pollinating the flower.

The dominant flower colour is green, often with white or cream stripes. In certain species, the tips of the sepals are red or orange in colour. The labellum is usually red or dark red.

 Pterostylis agathicola


Flower

Flower showing the red sepal and red labellum tip.
Name Pterostylis agathicola
Synonym Pterostylis graminea var. rubricaulis
Etymology
agathicola From the Genus Agathis, Kauri, and Latin incola meaning dweller, referring to the habbit of growing next to kauri trees.

Pterostylis agathicola is only found with kauri (Agathis australis), often growing only centimetres from the trunk. It is thought to depend on fungi associated with kauri. The flowers are carried on tall stems, up to 30cm, but more typical 20cm in length. The labellum twists slightly to the right.



Flower

Flower labellum twisting to the right.

Plant

Seed Pod

 Pterostylis banksii


Flower
Name Pterostylis banksii
Etymology
banksii Named after Sir Joseph Banks, 19th century botanist who accompanied Captian Cook on his first voyage and President of the Royal Society.

Pterostylis banksii produces the largest flower amongst New Zealand native orchids. The flowers are carried on tall stems, 50cm or longer. It is usually found growing along bush margins or on disturbed ground. This is perhaps the most common Pterostylis and it is not uncommon to find it growing in backyards.



Plants

Bud

Bud

 Pterostylis brumalis


Flower

There is a gnat at the end of the left sepal.
Name Pterostylis brumalis
Synonym Diplodium brumale
Etymology
brumalis From Latin brumalis meaning during winter, referring to the flowering time of this orchid.

Pterostylis brumalis, section Diplodium is another orchid associated with kauri and only grows under its drip line, though not as close as Pterostylis agathicola. It is also thought to depend on fungi associated with kauri. The dorsal sepal curls down and hides the labellum from view. The flowers are not very tall, at around 15cm. Like all other members in the section Diplodium, the leaves of non-flowering plants look very different from flowering plants.


Seed Pod

The seed pod forms soon after pollination. Next to the plant are a couple of non-flowering plants with the heart shape leaves.

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