Clear Mountain Garden Treasures
 

Clear Mountain Garden TreasuresCulture and Germination - English bluebells

bulb
An underground shoot with thickened leaf bases
see also Bulbs, Corms and Tubers.
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deciduous
Shedding of leaves at the
end of the growing season
see also Plant Life Cycle.
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community-pot
A pot or other container that is used
to grown lots of mainly small plants.
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slow-release
Granulised fertiliser enclosed by a shell that
slowly releases the food over a long period of time.
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community-pot
A pot or other container that is used
to grown lots of mainly small plants.
Hide
slow-release
Granulised fertiliser enclosed by a shell that
slowly releases the food over a long period of time.
Hide
English bluebells

Details
Family Amaryllidaceae
Name Hyacinthoides non-scripta
Common Name English bluebells

 More pictures

This hardy spring bulb flowers after daffodils. To get a long spring display, plant Snowflakes, daffodils and bluebells together. Flowering will commence wtih the snowflakes, followed by daffodils, and then the bluebells, each in succession as the other fades. They are perfect for naturalising under deciduous trees, or in a woodland setting.

First season bulbs

It is best to start them in a community container (say, up to 20 bulbs to a 10cm pot) of potting mix. Add ¼ teaspoon of 6 month slow release fertiliser (eg. Osmocote) to the mix. After the first year, the bulbs should have doubled in size.

Second season bulbs

Plant these into the ground where they are to grow. Allow minimum 2cm of space between the bulbs. Mulch lightly with no. 2 or no. 3 bark. Bulbs are best planted in groups rather than individually.

Mature bulbs

Plant these into the ground where they are to grow. Allow minimum 3cm of space between bulbs.

Bluebells naturalise very well in a woodland garden and will grow year after year with minimal maintenance. Clumps can be split every 2-3 years if you want more bulbs.

Feed bulbs in the ground at the end of Autumn with 3 month slow release fertiliser. There is usually no need to water unless the spring has been very dry.

A small percentage of the bulbs will produce white flowers, and a tiny percentage pink. These colours are a result of natural variation in the population. If you want a completely blue display, these bulbs will have to be removed as soon as you spot the white or pink flowers.


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