Clear Mountain Garden Treasures
 

Clear Mountain Garden TreasuresCattleya Alliance

Orchids
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseCattleya
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseCoelogyne
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseDendrobium
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseMasdevallia
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseNative Orchids
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseOncidium
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseTerestrials
Expand/CollapseExpand/CollapseOther Genera
Glossary
primary-hybrid
A hybrid where both parents are straight species, in contrast to
a complex hybrid where one or both parents are themselves hybrids.
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primary-hybrid
A hybrid where both parents are straight species, in contrast to
a complex hybrid where one or both parents are themselves hybrids.
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epiphyte
A plant that grows on another,
but does not obtain nutrients from its host.
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lithophyte
A plant that grows on rocks or stony soils.
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resupinate
Flowers, in particular orchids, the rotate 180° before opening.
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sequential-flowering
Flowering pattern whereby flowers are continuosly produced
to replace old ones that have faded,
as opposed to having flowers open all at once.
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terrestrial
A plant that grows on the ground, like most plants do.Grows on or in the ground.
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inflorescence
A flowering shoot with more than one flower.
Inflorescences may be branched or unbranched.
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secund
Leaves or flowers that all face one direction,
on one side of the stem.
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Cattleya Alliance

Cattleyas were known as the chocolate box orchid, growing large flowers from equally large plants that require a lot of warmth to grow. More recently, compact cattleyas have become popular. These are smaller, have more colour range and are more cold tolerant. The compact cattleyas have been bred from crossing miniature cattleyas with the large cattleyas of old.

Cattleya alliance is a big group of species and hybrids that come primarily from the following genera:

  • Brasovola
  • Broughtonia
  • Cattleya
  • Guarianthe
  • Laelia
  • Rhyncholaelia

Epidendrum, Encyclia, Prosthechea and Barkeria will also hybridise with Cattleyas and is considered to be part of the same alliance.


Barkeria skinneri
Vegetatively, this plant resembles a miniature crucifix orchid except that it has thick roots that do not seem to want to grow into its pot. It is better grown mounted on a raft, where the roots are exposed to the air. [More...]
Cattleya cinnabarina
This Cattleya is a lithophyte from Brazil, growing at intermediate elevations. The inflorescences emerge from the top of new pseudobulbs, each carrying a dozen or so bright orange flowers. [More...]

Cattleya Hybrids
Cattleyas were known as the chocolate box orchid because their large flowers used to graze the cover of chocolate boxes. Today, more compact hybrids that grow cooler are more popular. [More...]
Crucifix Orchid

Featured plant of June 2005
These crucifix orchids are easy to grow and produce flowers all year round. They deserve a spot in any garden. [More...]

Epidendrum centropetalum
This Epidendrum produces thin canes and masses of roots thicker than the canes. It has a tendency to keikei and will even flower on keikei growths. [More...]
Epidendrum ciliare
This Epidendrum has a wide range from central America, Mexico to the West Indies and to Brazil. It grows as an epiphyte or lithophyte from sea level to the highlands, growing in wet forests. Each pseudobulb grows two leathery leaves, looking more like a Cattleya. [More...]

Laelia anceps
This Mexican Laelia grows as an epiphyte on humid oak forests at intermediate to high elevations, though they are found in a variety of other habitats. Each pseudobulb only grows one leaf and when mature, produces a metre long inflorescence with half a dozen flowers. [More...]
Laelia gouldiana
This Laelia is an epiphyte from Mexico, growing at high elevations. The 60cm long inflorescences emerge from the top of stocky pseudobulbs. The flowers are pink. [More...]

Prosthechea prismatocarpa
This was once an Epidendrum, then its name was changed to Encyclia and now it belongs to the Prosthechea genus. It grows as an epiphyte in intermediate elevation cloud forests of central America and Mexico. Each pseudobulb produces two leaves and the inflorescence grows from the top of the pseudobulb, much like a Cattleya. [More...]

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